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You may have heard that people with diabetes are at a higher risk of contracting COVID-19. This is not the case. The truth is, people with diabetes are more likely to experience severe illness, long lasting effects, or even death if they are infected with COVID-19.

What We Know about Diabetes and COVID-19

In May, a nationwide multicentre observational study called the CORONADO study, observed the mortality risk in people with diabetes who were hospitalized for COVID-19.  The study population was 88% type 2 diabetics and 12% type 1 diabetics.  What they found was that one in ten diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19 died within seven days of hospital admission. One in five died within the first 28 days.

How Can We Improve These Numbers?

  • Metformin – Recent studies have shown that metformin decreased the mortality rate of diabetic patients with COVID-19. Those who took metformin had an 11% mortality rate compared to 24%  with type 2 diabetes who were not taking metformin when admitted to the hospital. These studies heavily indicate a strong, positive relationship between metformin, COVID and diabetes.
  • Vaccine – another way to protect those battling diabetes from COVID-19 is to consider getting the vaccine. There have been three emergency use authorized vaccines:  Pfizer, Moderna, and Johnson & Johnson.  Each vaccine appears to be safe and effective in adults with diabetes. Rigorous clinical trials tested these vaccines for safety in adults of all ages, races and ethnicities and chronic health conditions.
              • How will the vaccine affect blood sugar levels?
                • Receiving the vaccine can cause symptoms of illness that can increase your glucose levels. However, if carefully monitored and correctly hydrated side effects can be minimal.
              • Do diabetes medications affect the vaccine?
                • Currently, there is no evidence to suggest that the COVID-19 vaccine will interact with current medications. However, it may be helpful to avoid injecting insulin or placing a glucose sensor near your vaccine injection site for several days after receiving the vaccine. 
              • Should I get vaccinated if I have diabetes and other health conditions?
                • Complications of diabetes include heart disease and kidney disease.  These conditions put one at higher risk or death from COVID-19. 
                • Vaccination should be a priority for patients with type 2 diabetes who are at very high risk of severe COVID-19 to help protect this vulnerable population.


June 29, 2020 BlogCOVID 19Virus0

There are five forms of antibodies that the human body makes. There are two forms that are relevant for COVID 19, Igm and IgG.

Igm is a big molecule, which is the first molecule that your body makes when you are exposed to a particular antigen or virus. This is an acute phase type of antibody.

IgG is a long-term antibody that has memory for your immune system and also protects you long-term. The actual length of long-term protection is not known.

Typically, when you have antibody testing, you are tested for both Igm and IgG. These tests are not perfect. If someone tests positive for Igm but not IgG, we’re not sure if they are protected.

If someone has no Igm antibodies and lots of IgG antibodies, they’re likely protected due to the long-term memory of IgG.

The length of time the antibodies remain detectable following an infection is not known.

Antibodies

Source:

cdc.gov

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