News

GRID VIEW

No more posts
C.-diff-Upset-Stomach.jpg

January 30, 2020
C.-diff Upset Stomach

Clostridium difficile is a potentially deadly, spore-forming bacterium emerging as the leading cause of life-threatening, healthcare-associated infections worldwide. C. diff. toxins cause gastrointestinal disease that can lead to death. Symptoms range from mild diarrhea to life-threatening colitis and often include dehydration, abdominal pain and spasms.

Our ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research office is currently recruiting volunteers for recurrent clostridium difficile research trials.

Call today to get more information!
(904) 680-0871

Or sign up below!


  • More Information about C. Diff
More Information about C. Diff

Ask anyone who has had a Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, or C. diff) infection and they will probably tell you that it was one of the worst experiences of their life. Imagine the worst flu you’ve ever had but on steroids! C. diff is affectionately referred to as “deadly diarrhea” and with symptoms such as watery diarrhea 10 to 15 times a day that’s no joke! It can also come with a multitude of other symptoms such as: severe abdominal pain/cramping, rapid heart rate, fever, blood or pus in the stool, nausea, dehydration, and kidney failure.

What is C. Diff?

C. diff is one of the many different types of bacteria that lives in our intestines. It may sound gross but bacteria in your intestines are completely normal and you need a good balance of them to remain healthy. When something such as antibiotic use throws off the balance in your intestines C. diff may start to grow out of control and begin release toxins that attack the lining of the intestines which leads to that deadly diarrhea.

Is C. Diff contagious?

C. diff is contagious, so even if you were not recently on antibiotics, you can still catch C. diff by contact with a contaminated surface. Spores from C. diff bacteria come from human feces, soil, water and animal feces. These spores can also live for weeks or months outside the body.

Who is at risk?

C. diff is most often associated with doctor or healthcare facility visits or recent antibiotic use. There is a higher risk for adults ages 50 and over, especially those that have frequent doctor visits or have had any type of recent surgery or a hospitalization.

What can you do to lower your risk?

Good handwashing practices, especially after doctor or healthcare facility visits are a great start to lowering your risk of getting a C. diff infection. Another way is to take probiotics daily anytime you take an antibiotic. The reason for this is because when you take an antibiotic it not only kills off the bad bacteria, but it also kills off the good bacteria, giving C. diff a chance to thrive. Taking a probiotic, even if it’s just store bought yogurt, helps feed and rebalance your good gut bacteria. These are not foolproof, but they may help.

A Vaccine to prevent C. Diff?

While Handwashing and probiotics are certainly a must, researchers agree they are still not enough when it comes to preventing this life-threatening infection. Which is why we are involved in a cutting-edge research for C. Diff.



This research study is enrolling at:


ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
4800 Belfort Rd. Suite 301
Jacksonville, FL 32256
(904) 680-0871



If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


Cirrhosis.jpg

October 17, 2022
Cirrhosis


If you have Cirrhosis you may qualify for one of our studies.

Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:

  • investigational medication
  • study-related care from a local doctor
  • possible compensation
Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.




    Cirrhosis research is enrolling at:


    Nature Coast Clinical Research – Inverness
    411 West Highland Boulevard
    Inverness, FL 34452
    (352) 341-2100



    ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
    4800 Belfort Road, Suite 301
    Jacksonville, FL 32256
    (904) 680-0871



    Learn More

    If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


    Crohns-Disease-2.jpg

    April 28, 2020
    Crohn's Disease

    If you have Crohn’s Disease, you may qualify for one of our research studies.

    Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:

    • investigational medication
    • study-related care from a local doctor
    • possible compensation
    Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
    Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.

    Informational Articles:


    • Living with Crohn’s Disease Long Term
    Living with Crohn’s Disease Long Term

    Crohn’s disease is a chronic irritable bowel disease (IBD). In those with crohn’s disease, an abnormal immune system causes chronic inflammation in the digestive tract. IBD affects nearly 3 million Americans, and there is still no known cure.

    Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

     A person living with crohn’s disease can experience many symptoms and the severity can range from no pain at all to immobilizing. The symptoms include:

    • Diarrhea
    • Abdominal pain
    • Cramping
    • Weight Loss
    • Blood in Stools
    • Fatigue
    • Nausea and vomiting
    • No appetite
    • Anemia
    • Fever

    Long-Term effects of Crohn’s Disease

    Living with crohn’s disease can take its toll on the body long term. If left unmanaged, crohn’s disease can worsen and cause extreme pain and health concerns. Over time, crohn’s disease can cause severe damage to the GI tract. This can lead to:

    • Fistulas. When excessive inflammation causes ulcers to form on the intestine, a fistula can form. A fistula is when two parts of the intestine connect to form a tunnel to drain the pus from the infected area.
    • Intestinal Abscesses. This is caused by an excess of bacteria in the
    • Intestinal Blockages. This is a blockage that keeps food or liquid from passing through the small or large Symptoms can include severe abdominal pain, vomiting and inability to pass gas or stool.
    • Internal Bleeding. This internal bleeding is caused by tears in the bowel wall due to inflammation in the It is often the cause for diarrhea or bloody stool, a common symptom of crohn’s disease.

    Crohn’s disease can be managed and those with the disease can live a very fulfilling life. The main goal of management is to treat the inflammation, which should reduce the severity of the symptoms and hopefully lead to long-term remission.

    As mentioned, there is no known cure for crohn’s disease. The only way to find a cure and help those living with crohn’s disease is to participate in clinical trials to further research and hopefully, find a cure.

    Resources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, Bladder and Bowel



    Crohn’s Disease research is enrolling at:


    ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
    4800 Belfort Road, Suite 301
    Jacksonville, FL 32256
    (904) 680-0871



    Nature Coast Clinical Research – Inverness
    411 West Highland Boulevard
    Inverness, FL 34452
    (352) 341-2100



    Learn More

    If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


    Throat-EOE.jpg

    April 28, 2020
    Throat EOE


      Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, immune-mediated disorder. EoE symptoms can overlap with symptoms of a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

      Patients with EoE experience symptoms described as:

      • feeling like food or liquid is moving slowly
      • feeling food or liquid going down
      • food getting stuck in the esophagus
      • acid reflux, chest pain, nausea, vomiting
      • failure to thrive (children), regurgitation and esophageal strictures.

      It occurs in approximately 1 in 10,000 people and affects people of all age groups, with males being affected more frequently. EOE is associated with food allergies or other allergens, causing eosinophils (type of white blood cell) to migrate from the bone marrow (via blood) and settle in the esophagus causing inflammation to the esophagus. No one knows exactly why EoE occurs.  People with EoE tend to have allergic conditions such asthma, seasonal allergies, allergic rhinitis, and eczema.

      We are conducting a clinical trial for people with Eosinophilic Esophagitis. The purpose of this study is to assess the safety and tolerability of a new oral investigational medication for Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

      Volunteers may be eligible if they:

      • Are aged 18 or older.
      • Have a diagnosis or presumed diagnosis of EOE which will be confirmed during the screening process.

      There are additional criteria to meet to qualify for this study. Volunteers who qualify for our study will receive study related investigational medication, procedures and medical exams at no cost, as well as reimbursement for time and travel. No health insurance is required to participate.

      For more information call





        Eosinophilic Esophagitis research is enrolling at:


        ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
        4800 Belfort Road, Suite 301
        Jacksonville, FL 32256
        (904) 680-0871



        Nature Coast Clinical Research – Inverness
        411 West Highland Boulevard
        Inverness, FL 34452
        (352) 341-2100



        Learn More

        If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


        NASH-Fatty-Liver.jpg

        April 28, 2020
        NASH Fatty Liver


        If you have Fatty Liver, NASH or NAFLD, you may qualify for one of our studies.

        Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:

        • investigational medication
        • study-related care from a local doctor
        • possible compensation
        Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
        Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.


        • What is NASH? A Silent Liver Disease…
        What is NASH? A Silent Liver Disease…

        The liver is the second largest organ in the body.  Its function is to process everything we eat or drink and filter out any harmful substances from the blood.  When there is too much fat in one’s liver, the filtration process is interrupted and can become a health problem.

        It is estimated that 25% of the world has Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD), a precursor to NASH or Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis.  NASH is associated with obesity, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. It is now the most common liver disorder in the United States and the number one reason for liver transplants.

        Starting as Fatty Liver Disease and then progressing to NASH, the buildup of fat in the liver can lead to inflammation of the liver and liver cell damage.   Progression of NASH leads to fibrosis or stiffening of the liver and cirrhosis or scarring of the liver. NAFLD and NASH are both silent diseases with few symptoms even if the diseases progress to cirrhosis.

        Physicians can monitor liver function blood tests as well as abdominal ultrasounds and liver Fibroscans to determine if you are at risk of developing NAFLD and NASH. However, the only way to definitely determine of you have NASH is to perform a liver biopsy.

        The most common treatment for fatty liver disease is weight loss to reduce the fat in the liver. It is estimated that losing up to 3 to 5% of your body weight can help reduce the fat in the liver. Losing 10% of body weight may help reduce inflammation and even fibrosis in the liver. Currently, there are no medications which have been approved to treat fatty liver disease; however, many are in late stage development with promising results.

        To learn more about current clinical trial opportunities for fatty liver disease and NASH, please contact us.



        Fatty Liver, NASH or NAFLD research is enrolling at:


        Nature Coast Clinical Research – Inverness
        411 West Highland Boulevard
        Inverness, FL 34452
        (352) 341-2100



        Westside Center for Clinical Research
        810 Lane Avenue South
        Jacksonville, FL 32205
        (904) 693-1490



        ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
        4800 Belfort Road, Suite 301
        Jacksonville, FL 32256
        (904) 680-0871



        Learn More

        If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


        </