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December 12, 2019
Alzheimer's Disease

  • Mild Alzheimer’s Disease and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (Jacksonville)
Mild Alzheimer’s Disease and Impaired Glucose Tolerance (Jacksonville)

This is a study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an investigational drug in patients with mild Alzheimer’s disease and impaired glucose tolerance.

Phase: 3

Ages Eligible for Study: 50 Years to 85 Years

Inclusion Criteria:

  • Diagnosis of probable Alzheimer Disease (AD) with documented evidence of progression of disease
  • Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) score of 21-26, inclusive
  • Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 6.5% – 9.5%, inclusive
  • Caregiver willing to participate and be able to attend clinic visits with patient
  • Ability to ingest oral medications

There are additional criteria to meet in order to qualify for this research study. For more information contact us!

Study Location: Jacksonville


“It is only through clinical studies that we will develop and test promising new strategies for treatment, prevention, diagnosis, and ultimately a cure for Alzheimer’s disease”. (Alzheimer’s Association)

If you or someone you know is concerned about memory loss or Alzheimer’s disease, you may be eligible for one of our clinical research studies. No cost, and no health insurance is required to participate.

Call today or

Sign up below for more information!


Informational Articles:

  • More Information About Alzheimer’s Disease
  • Dementia Related to Over-the-counter Medications
More Information About Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that was first described in 1906 by Dr. Alois Alzheimer.  Since that time, Alzheimer’s disease has become the most common cause of dementia (accounting for 60-80% of cases).  It is estimated that in 2016, 5.4 million American’s of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease.  One in nine people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s. JCCR has participated as a research center in clinical trials over the past several years to limit the devastating consequences of this difficult to treat disease.

The number of Americans with Alzheimer’s is anticipated to escalate rapidly with the aging of our population, with estimates ranging from 13.8 million to 16 million by 2050.  This estimate assumes no medical breakthroughs to prevent or cure the disease.

Alzheimer’s is a slowly progressive brain disease that begins well before clinical symptoms emerge.  The persistent accumulation of abnormal proteins in the brain lead to death of brain cells over time, which causes decline in cognitive function.  Thus, a significant amount of protein accumulates in the brain over many years before a sufficient amount of brain injury has occurred to cause symptoms noticed by the patient or family/friends.

The medications currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of Alzheimer’s temporarily improve symptoms by increasing the amount of specific neurotransmitters in the brain.  However, they do not address the accumulation of abnormal proteins or brain cell injury and, thus, do not treat the underlying cause of the disease.  The first medication approved by the FDA for the treatment of Alzheimer’s was donepezil in 1996.  The last was memantine in 2003.  There have been no new/novel treatments approved by the FDA for the treatment of Alzheimer’s since 2003.  From 2002-2012, 244 drugs for Alzheimer’s were tested in clinical trials, and only one went on to receive FDA approval.

Currently, a worldwide quest is underway to find new treatments to stop, slow or even prevent Alzheimer’s.  The last 10-years have seen tremendous growth in research on early detection, and researchers believe that early detection will be key in preventing, slowing and stopping the disease.  There is a new wave of optimism in the scientific community about Alzheimer’s treatments.

As eloquently stated by Bill Thies, PhD, Senior Scientist in Residence with the Alzheimer’s Association:  “Despite increasing momentum in Alzheimer’s research, we still have two main obstacles to overcome.  First, we need volunteers for clinical trials.  Volunteering to participate in a study is one of the greatest ways someone can help move Alzheimer’s research forward.  Second, we need a significant increase in federal research funding.  Investing in research now will cost our nation far less than the cost of care for the rising number of Americans who will be affected by Alzheimer’s in the coming decades.”

Here at JCCR, we understand the importance of recognizing cognitive decline and identifying Alzheimer’s in its early stages.  Recent scientific breakthroughs provide hope that new treatments can prevent accumulation of abnormal proteins in the brain and markedly slow the disease. We want to help individuals and their healthcare providers identify the early signs of memory changes so that effective interventions can be initiated promptly.  We want to help individuals maintain their memory function and their independence.  We also want to facilitate participation in clinical trials that will help our understanding of memory disorders and lead to treatments that will help maintain memory function.  We look forward to working with you and your healthcare providers.

Erin G. Doty, MD
Neurologist, Board Certified

Dementia Related to Over-the-counter Medications

Memory issues occur commonly and when they begin, one may worry about the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.  While Alzheimer’s may cause memory loss, memory loss is also a symptom of many reversible conditions. Early memory testing is crucial to determine the cause of memory loss to help reverse it before it becomes permanent.

For example, certain over-the-counter medications have been associated with dementia. A recent study came out this month linking Benadryl to dementia. Benadryl has many uses, including allergy symptom relief. The active ingredient in Benadryl is diphenhydramine. This drug blocks the action of acetylcholine (anticholinergic effect) and is used as a sedative because it causes drowsiness. Diphenhydramine is used in most over-the-counter sleeping pills, for motion sickness, and other allergy medications.

A study completed in 2015 at the University of Washington showed the longer and more consistently people took anticholinergics, the more likely they were to develop dementia. Other drugs that contain anticholinergics are used to treat diseases like asthma, incontinence, gastrointestinal cramps, and muscular spasms. They are also prescribed for depression and sleep disorders.

While we do not fully understand dementia, we do know that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine is important in brain processing and memory.  We know that the acteylcholinesterase inhibitors (drugs like Aricept (donepezil), Exelon (rivastigmine) and Razadyne (galantamine) which inhibit the breakdown of acetylcholine, do provide symptomatic improvement in affected patients.

It would seem that taking a combination of acetylcholinesterase (cholinergic) with an anticholinergic drug (such as Benadryl) is probably not a good idea.  In fact a recent study showed 16% of Alzheimer’s patients living independently were doing just that.
This 2015 study is backed up by another study that came out this month offering the most definitive proof yet, that anticholinergic drugs are linked with cognitive impairment and increased risk of dementia. Using brain imaging they found that patients taking anticholinergic drugs indeed had lower metabolisms and reduced brain sizes.

The bottom line is that given all the research evidence, you should be aware that these over-the-counter medicines may reduce the effectiveness of your prescription medicines. If you or a loved is worried about memory loss, the first step is to get tested to see if it’s from a treatable or reversible cause. Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research offers a professional memory screening for no cost to you. Make an appointment today to help put your mind at ease.

1-   https://www.medicinenet.com
2-  https://www.healthline.com



This research study is enrolling at:


Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research
4085 University Blvd., South, Suite 1
Jacksonville, FL 32216
(904) 730-0166



Learn More

If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


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July 21, 2021
Axial Spondyloarthritis


    We are conducting a research study for people with an existing diagnosis of Axial Spondyloarthritis. This research study will be evaluating the safety and tolerability of an investigational medication for patients with rheumatic disease.

    You may be eligible if you:

    • Are between the ages of 18 and 60 or
      • Are 65 years of age or less and have received the COVID-19 vaccine
    • Have a BMI of less than 30 kg/m2 or   
    • Have a diagnosis of Axial Spondyloarthritis

    There are additional criteria to meet to qualify for this study. Volunteers who qualify for our study will receive study related investigational medication and medical exams at no cost, as well as reimbursement for time and travel. No health insurance is required to participate.

    For more information call:

    (904) 730-0166
    Or sign up our office will call you



    This research study is enrolling at:


    Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research
    4085 University Blvd., South, Suite 1
    Jacksonville, FL 32216
    (904) 730-0166



    Learn More

    If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


    Colonoscopy-camera.jpg

    March 24, 2021
    Colonoscopy Camera


      We are enrolling in a new clinical trial for colorectal cancer screening.  The purpose of this study is to assess a new investigational test for colorectal cancer detection.

      You may be eligible if you:

      • Are 40 years or older
      • Are eligible and willing to do a screening colonoscopy (through your own insurance or self-paid)

      There are additional criteria to meet to qualify for this study. Please contact us for any questions!

      For more information call

      (904) 693-1490
      Or sign up below!




        This research study is enrolling at:


        Westside Center for Clinical Research
        810 Lane Avenue South
        Jacksonville, FL 32205
        (904) 693-1490



        Learn More

        If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


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        June 13, 2022


          We are conducting a research study to compare three different lots of Novavax COVID-19 vaccine in participants who have been previously vaccinated. The Novavax vaccine is protein-based, different from mRNA technology. The study is approximately one month long. There is no placebo involved, all participants will receive a Novavax vaccine.

          You may be eligible if you:

          • Are 18 to 49 years old
          • Are healthy (stable medical conditions)
          • Received a full original series of a COVID-19 vaccine (Examples below):
            • Novavax – At least two doses
            • Moderna – At least two doses
            • Johnson and Johnson – One dose
            • Pfizer – At least two doses
          • Have a COVID-19 vaccine card documenting full series of vaccines

          You may not qualify to participate if you:

          • Have received a COVID-19 booster in the past six months
          • Have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the past four months
          • Are currently in another research study
          • Are immune-compromised
          • Received any vaccine within 90 days of study start

          There are additional criteria to meet to qualify for this study. Volunteers who qualify for our study will receive all study-related investigational vaccines, procedures, and medical exams at no cost, as well as a stipend for time and travel. No health insurance is required to participate.

          For more information call

          (904) 730-0166

          Or sign up below, and our office will call you!


          Learn More

          If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


          Crohns-Disease-2.jpg

          April 28, 2020
          Crohn's Disease

          If you have Crohn’s Disease, you may qualify for one of our research studies.

          Qualified volunteers may receive at no cost:

          • investigational medication
          • study-related care from a local doctor
          • possible compensation
          Health insurance isn’t required to participate.
          Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.

          Informational Articles:


          • Living with Crohn’s Disease Long Term
          Living with Crohn’s Disease Long Term

          Crohn’s disease is a chronic irritable bowel disease (IBD). In those with crohn’s disease, an abnormal immune system causes chronic inflammation in the digestive tract. IBD affects nearly 3 million Americans, and there is still no known cure.

          Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease

           A person living with crohn’s disease can experience many symptoms and the severity can range from no pain at all to immobilizing. The symptoms include:

          • Diarrhea
          • Abdominal pain
          • Cramping
          • Weight Loss
          • Blood in Stools
          • Fatigue
          • Nausea and vomiting
          • No appetite
          • Anemia
          • Fever

          Long-Term effects of Crohn’s Disease

          Living with crohn’s disease can take its toll on the body long term. If left unmanaged, crohn’s disease can worsen and cause extreme pain and health concerns. Over time, crohn’s disease can cause severe damage to the GI tract. This can lead to:

          • Fistulas. When excessive inflammation causes ulcers to form on the intestine, a fistula can form. A fistula is when two parts of the intestine connect to form a tunnel to drain the pus from the infected area.
          • Intestinal Abscesses. This is caused by an excess of bacteria in the
          • Intestinal Blockages. This is a blockage that keeps food or liquid from passing through the small or large Symptoms can include severe abdominal pain, vomiting and inability to pass gas or stool.
          • Internal Bleeding. This internal bleeding is caused by tears in the bowel wall due to inflammation in the It is often the cause for diarrhea or bloody stool, a common symptom of crohn’s disease.

          Crohn’s disease can be managed and those with the disease can live a very fulfilling life. The main goal of management is to treat the inflammation, which should reduce the severity of the symptoms and hopefully lead to long-term remission.

          As mentioned, there is no known cure for crohn’s disease. The only way to find a cure and help those living with crohn’s disease is to participate in clinical trials to further research and hopefully, find a cure.

          Resources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation, Bladder and Bowel



          Crohn’s Disease research is enrolling at:


          ENCORE Borland Groover Clinical Research
          4800 Belfort Road, Suite 301
          Jacksonville, FL 32256
          (904) 680-0871



          Nature Coast Clinical Research – Inverness
          411 West Highland Boulevard
          Inverness, FL 34452
          (352) 341-2100



          Learn More

          If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!


          Diabetes-2.jpg

          December 11, 2019
          Diabetes


          If you or someone you know has Diabetes Type 2, call us today! We have research studies enrolling now.

          No cost, and no health insurance is required to participate.
          Ask your doctor or contact our clinic for more information.

          For more information call:
          (904) 730-0166
          Or sign up below!


          • More Information about Diabetes
          More Information about Diabetes

          If diabetes is brought up to a member of the general public, they will usually be aware that the condition affects a person’s ability to regulate their blood sugar. However, they may not realize what is involved beyond checking blood sugars and possibly injecting insulin. On the other hand, most people that have been diagnosed with diabetes know that it is a very complex condition. Uncontrolled, high blood sugar affects everything from your head to your toes! If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, it is extremely important to manage and control your blood sugars. This will help minimize and prevent complications that arise from uncontrolled diabetes.

          There is a common saying that “diabetes will not kill you, but its complication will.” Excess sugar in the blood causes damage to the small blood vessels and nerves. This in turn leads to damage to various diabetic complications including:

          • Alzheimer’s Disease
          • Blindness
          • Depression
          • Diabetic nephropathy or kidney damage
          • Diabetic neuropathy or nerve damage
          • Diabetic ulcers
          • Erectile dysfunction
          • Gastroparesis

          Although there is not a cure for diabetes there are many effective avenues available to help manage and prevent the complications resulting from diabetes. ENCORE Research Group is working tirelessly to find new therapies for these conditions. If you would like to experience the science firsthand and help to move medicine forward, consider volunteering for a clinical trial!



          This research study is enrolling at:


          Jacksonville Center for Clinical Research
          4085 University Blvd., South, Suite 1
          Jacksonville, FL 32216
          (904) 730-0166



          Learn More

          If you want us to contact you about our research studies call (904) 730-0166 or sign up below!